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Jul
29

Proper Sheeting and Heel Angle

A common habit among many sailors is to over-sheet and over trim. As the saying goes,

“When in doubt, let it out!”

This is especially true when sailing the TRIAK.

With it’s wing and outrigger design, the boat only heels over so far before the wing tip starts to bury in the water causing the boat to slow. This is your sign to sheet out on the mainsheet (and spinnaker sheet) to balance the boat out and keep your momentum.

TRIAK sailing the mainsail on Lake Tahoe, California

Keeping the mainsail and boat in proper trim and in the groove.

The floats (amas) have about 85 pounds of bouyancy so they will bury completely at certain sail loads, typically starting above 15 knots of wind. Conditions, the weight of the TRIAK or and the load of the boat make a differnce as well.

If you find the boat is healing over you are burying the wing tip frequently, let the mainsheet out until the sail starts to luff in the pocket toward the mast (the luff), then pull in slightly on the mainsheet until the sail is full and trim. The fun is to constantly keep the sail in trim, pointing the optimum direction relative to the wind, and keeping the TRIAK “in the groove.” The TRIAK is very responsive and you will immediately feel the acceleration when in proper trim and heel, and feel the drag and reduced speed when not. It’s all about feel.

Sail in good trim and have fun!

Two TRIAKs sailing on Lake Tahoe, California

Two TRIAKs sailing on Lake Tahoe, California

 

Two TRIAKs. Mainsail and spinnaker sailing. Lake Tahoe, California

Spinnaker and mainsail triming are important.